A Case Study: The Frontside Heelflip, Why Is This Trick So Damn Hard?

Ok so yesterday I was looking at this stupid ad realizing once again, that Ishod is everything I ever wanted to be in a skateboarder and I'm just, well...Me :^\

BUT THIS IS NOT A SADBOY ARTICLE. 

I realized something. I realized that the frontside heelflip is actually a really, really fucking hard trick. Have you ever tried a frontside heel? (yes, you have) Have you ever landed a good frontside heel? (probably not)

Note: We are talking about regular frontside heelflips for all of you out there saying "well, I have em switch". Yeah, you and the rest of the world, champ. 

So I was pondering, and I noticed that there are actually only a handful of people that I've seen do a really good frontside heelflip. Let's go through some of those examples. We'll start with possibly the most important one of all time, Clyde Singleton. 

That little tack at the end. :'^)

Clyde changed the game right here. Just a classic catch and turn. I could go on about this one, but if you know you know, and if you don't know, well your ass better call somebody

Moving right along. You know - for the next one I initially thought about the one he does over the rail into the bank in Can't Stop - but then I remembered that Ray actually does an ODE TO CLYDE. Man this is really just tying itself together nicely. 

I love this one so much. I know you can't see his face in this pixelated gif, but I like to imagine that he has a huge smile on his face as he roasted this bad boy. Really, a beautiful example right here.

I actually like to think that all of my favorites are secretly best friends and go to the movies and stuff on Sundays. Is that weird?

Anyway - the next one is equally important, but for different reasons. Ladies and gents, Louie.

The insane thing about Louie's is that he doesn't do the catch and pivot, it's all one fucking motion. He lands on the tail, guys (and girls). It's not even scooped like a varial heel. It actually makes no damn sense at all, and shouldn't really work, to be honest. 

So you're probably saying "here goes Smltalk again, only talking about stuff from 10+ years ago, what's next a PJ reference?". 

You're damn right. PJ did a frontside 360 heelflip, and we can't not talk about it. I'm sorry, you're just going to have to deal with it. 

Take it in. 

This doesn't mean that there aren't any modern pros out there...Team Handsome seems to account for a large percentage of modern regular frontside heelflips.

Austyn and Dylan roast fs heels all day, and probably fs heel all night right into a pool of hot chicks. Good for them. 

This is where we at Smltalk took out the scalpel and really dissected the trick, and it's place in modern skateboarding. Dylan and Austyn are not ordinary skateboarders, they are two of the best. In fact - it seems that the only skateboarders doing frontside heels are ones that are very skilled, because this trick is, as stated earlier, incredibly difficult. 

People all over the world are doing insane tricks every day, grinding longer, going faster, and just doing generally more difficult, complicated things. In a recent Mini Top 5's, Carroll was asked what tricks should go back to being referred to by their original names. Observe number four on his list:

Hardflip—frontside varial flip. Shit ain’t hard anymore

Our point here is that everything has been mastered, so tricks that are secretly easy (e.g. varial flips) regain popularity because handsome individuals with cool clothes bring them back. But something has been left behind folks, and I think you know what it is by now. So let's do this:

CONCLUSION

IF: Hardflips are no longer hard, and Frontside Heelflips are actually INSANELY hard.

THEN: The name hardflip is incorrect.

SO: We are now renaming Frontside Heelpflips "Hardflips" going forward. You can call the trick formerly known as "hardflip" whatever you want. We don't care. 

The end.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all great fs heelflippers, we'd like to note Wu Welsh has an exquisite frontside heelflip @ Three Up Three Down in SF, and even Mr. Eric Koston will tell you this trick is hard as fuck (but he can still do them really, really well).